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Environmental Issues

Work in waste management is increasingly technical. This work involves both collection, transport and sorting of waste, then either recycling or "smart" treatment of waste to minimise any environmental impact.

 

Fungi

By ACS Distance Education on July 9, 2018 in Environmental Issues & Science | comments

The world of fungi is a critical part of the ecology; but often unseen, misunderstood and unappreciated.

Our mushroom, plant pathology and microbiology courses can help change your perception of the world of fungi.

 

Growing Year Round Beans

By ACS Distance Education on April 26, 2018 in Environmental Issues & Horticulture | comments

Growing Beans Year Round 

For the home vegetable garden, the most widely grown beans are usually common (green) beans, runner beans, and broad beans. The common bean is known by a number of other names including green beans, French beans, haricot beans, flageolet, and string beans.

They are all cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris. Most green beans have a compact or bushy growth habit and are referred to as ‘bush beans’, or sometimes ‘dwarf beans’.  Some cultivars have a climbing habit and are known as pole beans.

Runner beans, Phaseolus coccineus, are also climbers. They have striking red flowers which have made them popular as ornamental vines as well as vegetable crops. 

Broad beans, Vicia faba, go by many other names like faba beans, fava beans, horse beans, field beans and English beans. It all depends where you live. In Australia, New Zealand and the UK, broad bean is the preferred name whereas in the United States they are called fava beans. 

 

Learn to Manage the Land Better

By ACS Distance Education on June 1, 2017 in Environmental Issues & Horticulture | comments

Land has never been more precious. 

Anyone who owns land has a responsibility to care for that land properly - to both protect your own investment and to protect the legacy you leave to future generations.

 

 

You have no doubt heard about Chain of Custody (COC) issues in the many forensic TV shows on our screens. The shows where faulty documentation destroys an otherwise carefully prepared case and the criminal goes free!  So exactly what is a COC?  It is the chronological ‘paper’ trail, showing the collection, transfer, receipt, analysis, storage, and disposal of a sample. At all stages, the sample is in someone’s custody—that person is responsible for it.

The COC is just as important in environmental  and agricultural sciences -the integrity of the sampling, testing and reporting chain is very important