Play leadership VRE101

Learn to be a Play Leader

  • A career path
  • As a volunteer
  • As a Parent

Play leaders are people who create and manage play opportunities. Sometimes play leaders are people who are fulfilling a duel role. They can be parents, teachers, pre-school teachers or nannies, who look after both the play needs, and other needs of children in their care. Some play leaders are employed specifically to concentrate on managing the play needs of children. They may be an assistant to a teacher or care worker, or they may be employed in a supervised playground, play centre or other facility that focuses on play.

This course will develop valuable skills in anyone working, or wishing to work with children. Our staff have experience training play leaders since the late 1970s, our knowledge in the industry is extensive and current. We have devised this truly fantastic course which will challenge you and arm you with the skills you need to succeed in this vitally important industry. Children deserve the best!



Lesson Structure

There are 11 lessons in this course:

  1. Understanding Play
    • To explain the purpose of play in the cognitive, physical and social development of a child.
  2. Leadership Skills
    • To determine the skills required to carry out a play leadership role in different situations.
  3. Planning Play Programs
    • To develop a plan for a supervised children's play program.
  4. Child Development through Play
    • To develop a basic understanding of the impact of play upon the psychological development of a child.
  5. Play Safety
    • To determine appropriate measures to take to protect a child's safety when at play, while minimising any interference which might diminish the quality of the play experience.
  6. Physical Play
    • To develop an understanding of options for physical play activities, including games and sports, in a supervised play program.
  7. Social Play
    • To develop an understanding of options for social play activities, in a supervised play program.
  8. Adventure Play
    • To develop a basic ability to plan, establish and manage a supervised adventure playground.
  9. Play Apparatus
    • To develop an ability to evaluate a range of different play apparatus, including playground structures, toys, sports equipment, commenting on quality, safety features, appropriate applications and cost benefit.
  10. Activities
    • To broaden your scope of opportunities that can be offered for children to play, appropriate to a wide range of different situations.
  11. Special Project

Each lesson culminates in an assignment which is submitted to the school, marked by the school's tutors and returned to you with any relevant suggestions, comments, and if necessary, extra reading.

Aims

  • Explain the purpose of play in the cognitive, physical and social development of a child.
  • Determine the skills required to carry out a play leadership role in different situations
  • Plan a supervised children's play program.
  • Describe the impact of play upon the psychological development of a child.
  • Determine appropriate measures to take to protect a child's safety when at play, while minimising any interference which might diminish the quality of the play experience.
  • Explain options for physical play activities, including games and sports, in a supervised play program.
  • Explain options for social play activities, in a supervised play program.
  • Plan, establish and manage a supervised adventure
  • Evaluate a range of different play apparatus, including playground structures, toys, sports equipment, commenting on quality, safety features, appropriate applications and cost benefit.
  • Expand your knowledge of opportunities that can be offered for children to play, appropriate to a wide range of different situations.



This is a 100hr course
- Study at your own pace

 

PLAY LEADERSHIP

Play leaders are people who create and manage play opportunities.

Sometimes play leaders are people who are fulfilling a duel role. They can be parents, teachers, pre school teachers, or nannies, who look after both the play needs, and other needs of children in their care.

Some play leaders are employed specifically to concentrate on managing the play needs of children. They may be an assistant to a teacher or care worker, or they may be employed in a supervised playground, play centre or other facility that focuses on play.

Play is far more important than most people think.

Children who play well develop properly.

Children who are deprived of play opportunities will develop abnormally,

and are likely to suffer problems as a result later in life.

Adults who cannot or do not play usually suffer greater stress.

Children in fact learn more life skills through play, than they do through formal education.

Levels of Childhood Development

Child psychology is concerned with the development of a person during childhood. This involves the development of a child’s mental capacity (ie. cognitive development); and the development of their emotional and social behaviour.

It is important to state that most of these forms of development do not simply cease as a child reaches adulthood. Adults also are capable of growing and changing in terms of their mental, emotional and social behaviours. Some characteristics are however more easy to develop and change during childhood.

It is important to note that any distinction between cognitive, emotional and social aspects of behaviour are purely theoretical (ie. the distinction is made simply to help us learn and understand, but in reality, you should think of these aspects overlapping and blending with each other, rather than being distinctly separate parts of the child’s character.

When problems develop in any area of development, they usually become rapidly evident in other areas as well. The study of child psychology is partly concerned with identifying such interrelationships.

Needless to say, child psychologists are particularly interested in discovering the causes of certain patterns of behaviour in children. They are interested, for instance, in how the child’s environment and relationships (eg. home, school and neighbourhood) affect the child’s development. This involves an attempt to establish causes.

They are also interested in "outcomes" of certain childhood experiences; for example, how does the experience of living in a poverty stricken environment affect the later behaviour of the child?

It is difficult to identify "one" solitary cause for any behaviour. Usually behaviour is far more complex, having been influenced by a mixture of prior experiences.

   

Enrol Now!

Fee Information (S1)
Prices in Australian Dollars

PlanAust. PriceOverseas Price
A 1 x $748.00  1 x $680.00
B 2 x $407.00  2 x $370.00

Note: Australian prices include GST. 
More information about
Fees & Payment Plans.

Enrol Now 5% discount!
Select a payment plan:

Courses can be started anytime
from anywhere in the world!

All orders processed in Australian dollars.