Nutritional Foundations of Disease (Human Nutrition III) BRE302

Understand How Nutrition Affects Health

Learn how diet can affect health

  • Study allergies, food sensitivity and other health disorders that are affected by what you eat.
  • Learn to manage diet better to minimize health issues

The healthy body has a remarkable ability to process and eliminate unwanted chemicals. If a person is in peak condition, any excess or unwanted components of food are likely to be eliminated through the urinary or excretory system, through sweating, and respiration. Very few people, however, are in such a good state of health; and even those who are, are unlikely to continue disposing of unwelcome chemical compounds year after year for their entire lifespan. Sooner or later their ability to tolerate undesirable foods will decrease, and problems will develop.

 

COURSE STRUCTURE
This course is divided into eight lessons as follows:.

  1. Problems With Eating
  2. Dental Problems
  3. Fibre and Bowel Diseases
  4. Different Ways of Eating
  5. Food Toxicity A
  6. Food Toxicity B
  7. Detoxification/Body Cleansing
  8. Consulting/Giving Advice

AIMS

  • Explain different food related health problems.
  • Determine the effect which different physical methods of food intake, can have upon health, including time and order of eating, and chewing.
  • Manage food sensitivity problems.
  • Implement procedures to avoid food poisoning.
  • List food related factors which can have a negative influence on health.
  • Distinguish between characteristics of the diets of two healthy people with diets of unhealthy people, studied by the learner.
  • Differentiate between dietary and other affects, on the health of a specific individual.
  • Explain the significance of cholesterol to health of a specific demographic group.
  • Explain the significance of diet to cancer in a specified demographic group.
  • Compare differences in physiological responses to different patterns of eating, including: *The order in which different types of food are eaten; * The time of day when different types of food are eaten; *The degree to which different types of foods are chewed; *The speed of swallowing; *The amount of time between eating different food types.
  • Explain food combining principles, in a diet designed to optimise food combining principles.
  • Plan a dietary timetable which optimises the ability of a typical person on a specified budget, to digest and assimilate food.
  • Formulate a nutritionally balanced vegetarian diet.
  • Formulate a diet compatible with a person's level of physical activity.
  • Manage fibre in the diet.
  • Manage diet to optimise dental health.
  • Recommend a safe method of detoxification.
  • Recommend a nutritional program to a client in a proper and responsible manner.

Some people seem to be able to eat anything, without suffering any signs of ill health. They always appear fit, never get sick, don't get over weight, and they still eat junk food and other things which others simply cannot tolerate.

WHAT THE COURSE COVERS

  • Distinguish between food sensitivity and toxicity in two different case studies.
  • Distinguish between chemical and pathological toxicity, in four different case studies.
  • List foods commonly associated with sensitivity problems.
  • List foods commonly associated with toxicity problems.
  • Explain problems associated with common food sensitivity and toxicity including: -Gluten Sugar -Salt -Yeast -MSG.
  • Develop a checklist of body reactions which may occur, in response to food sensitivity or toxicity, as a tool for diagnosing possible causes.
  • Describe different scientific procedures used to test for food sensitivities and toxicities.
  • Explain the role of histamines, anti histamines and steroids in human toxicology.
  • Explain first aid treatments for people suspected to be suffering from different food sensitivity or toxicity problems.
  • Explain a procedure used by a health practitioner, to treat someone affected by a specified type of food poisoning.
  • Determine guidelines to minimise food toxicity problems in a visited restaurant.
  • List factors which can cause food poisoning.
  • Explain different pathological sources of serious food poisoning; including identification, physiological effects and control.
  • Explain chemical poisoning risks associated with the use of chemicals to control pathological poisoning risks.
  • Explain food storage and preparation techniques essential to minimising food poisoning.
  • Develop guidelines to minimise food poisoning your own kitchen, based upon your normal dietary requirements.
  • Develop guidelines to minimise food toxicity problems in a restaurant.
  • Explain procedures practiced by a visited food manufacturer, to control food sensitivity and toxicity problems with their product.
  • Compare in a chart or table, three different styles of vegetarianism.
  • Explain different specified risks associated with a vegetarian diet.
  • List alternative sources for different components of foods normally derived from animal products, including: *Tryptophan *Methionine *Valine *Threonine *Phenylalanine *Leucine *Isoleucine *Lysine.
  • Formulate a balanced vegetarian diet, for a specified individual.
  • Explain the relationship between different types of food and exercise.
  • Explain the management of diet for a specified situation, before, during and after activity.
  • Explain how diet can effect performance of different specified types of exercises.
  • Explain the role of fibre in the digestive system, of a specified demographic group.
  • Explain possible implications of inadequate fibre in the diet, for different specified demographic groups.
  • Compare relative value of the fibre content of different foods.
  • Explain inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), in a specified case study.
  • Compare fibre content in the diets of different people interviewed.
  • Recommend modifications to the fibre intake people interviewed.
  • Explain the biology of the teeth, including anatomy and physiology.
  • Explain the effect of different foods on the teeth and gums.
  • Describe dental problems influenced by diet.
  • Develop guidelines for healthy dental hygiene procedures, including both dietary and other practices.
  • List factors which affect accumulation of toxins in the body.
  • Explain different benefits of detoxification, for three different demographic groups.
  • Explain different techniques of accelerating elimination of toxins from the body -Heat (eg. Sauna) -Fasting -Diet Modification -Antioxidants -Exercise -Drugs and Herbs - Disease Stress control.
  • Explain the dangers of excessive detoxification, for different demographic groups.
  • Evaluate appropriate detoxification needs for an specified individual.
  • Recommend a detoxification program based upon a specified evaluation.
  • Explain legal risks involved in giving nutritional advice to a client.
  • Explain the moral responsibilities involved in providing nutritional advice.
  • Determine ways in which specific examples of nutritional advice may be misinterpreted.
  • Develop guidelines for a system to ensure nutritional advice is followed by clients as intended, including provision for monitoring.
  • Demonstrate a consultation with a client, real or hypothetical, presenting a nutritional program, designed for that client.

 

Dietary Tips for a Healthier Heart

This is certainly a disease of affluence. It is comparatively rare in developing countries. Deaths from heart disease increased in Great Britain from 80 per million men in 1930, to 8 times that number in 1974. In 2010 the rate is predicted to be almost 850 per million! The cause is not completely understood, but there are many factors which have been identified as increasing the risk. These include: smoking, lack of exercise, obesity, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, poor diet and family history of the disease.

Diet strongly affects four factors associated with heart disease:

  • Cholesterol
  • Blood Pressure
  • Obesity
  • Diabetes

Improving diet is never a guarantee that heart disease will not occur, but an appropriate diet will lessen the risk of heart disease.

Recommendations include:

  • Eat less fat (saturated fat and cholesterol in particular)
  • Minimise intake of foods high in triglycerides
  • Minimise sugar intake
  • Minimise salt intake
  • Minimise alcohol intake
  • Eat more foods which are high in carbohydrates and fibre
  • Eat more fish

Fats

  • Small amounts of fat are needed in the diet (but only small amounts!).
  • Excessive fat provides an excess of calories which can increase obesity.
  • Research shows that calories eaten as fat are more likely to increase weight, than the same number of calories eaten as carbohydrate or protein.
  • Excessive saturated fat can raise cholesterol levels in the blood.
  • Foods which are high in saturated fats include milk and dairy products, some margarines, and some oils (eg. palm & coconut oil).
  • Chicken fat is mainly under the skin, so by removing the skin will usually remove the fat.
  • Lean meats have less saturated fats than other meats.
  • Cooking methods such as broiling or baking will remove fat (Frying does not!). However if you bake meat and don’t have it elevated above the bottom of the pan (on a wire rack or similar) it will simply shallow fry in its own fat.

 

 

   

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